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on. we did not decide to enforce that law, we decided to come up with reasonable speed limits and then enforce that law. we gave amnesty to all the people that had been illegally driving. get the back taxes. let's get to get them in the light of day so they are e andcted from abus an exploitation. we have high tech workers that don't come here but go to other countries and compete with us. we need people from ranchers to derek to farmers. i don't think this bill goes far enough. i would like to see more, but this is progress. >> your statement mentions several examples of how terrorist disadvantage of our system. even mention how awesome terrorists have applied and received asylum. you mentioned the bill would allow people will have filed a frivolous asylum applications benefits under the legalization system. do you know how many people fall into that category and how does the bill before us make the current system weaker? >> i do outlined in my written testimony a number of pages of terrorists who have taken advantage of asylum. we have most notably the case just a few weeks
or forced into exile abroad. the comprehensive immigration reform law under consideration includes important provisions to make businesses more competitive. this does the same, which is why it is supported by fortune 500 companies like intel, marriott, texas instruments, u.s. airways. the failure to recognize gay and lesbian families is a direct impact on american business. in a letter last month to the eight senators who authored the border security economic opportunity and immigration modernization act, a coalition of 28 of the most prominent companies wrote, we of each work to help american employees whose families were split apart because ey cannot sponsor the permanent partners for immigration benefits. we lost productivityhen those families are sepated. with borne the cost of transferring and retraining employees talented employees so they may live a lot of -- they live abroad with loved ones. it is not just major corporations that lose out. in columbia, south carolina, restaurant owner with 25 employees recently made the decision to close the business in order to move so he could be w
quickly walk away from it, what is not normal. that we only have so many law enforcement people. we have a guy in times where the waterway and there may be a normal explanation for it. i get on the metra system and by putting my earphones and a listen to my music or whatever when that is probably not a very smart thing, particularly for a guy like me to do. but it is just being aware -- you know, it is so easy. when i went to vietnam ever went said, stay alert, stay alive. i think people will be a little bit more alert right now, but just look for things that are out of place. is an author.t is ned zsa,ler republican. 'd think throrism comes at all different forms and different faces, not just literally, but metaphorically, too. you cannot say that it is not political or that it is. it is hard to label active terrorism -- acts of terrorism sometimes providing it is up to with identifying terrorism. we sometimes let our guard down and i feel like we do not know when the time is to act. when something should be under suspicion. we wait for something to happen. tough one. is a you are
-- there are laws that say you cannot set up shop there unless you can prove your self-sufficient economically or you're not going to take a job from a french person. host: let's look a little bit more at "the hill" to find out what we know about the suspects in the boston bombing attacks. the bombing was allegedly carried out by chechens who immigrated to the united states. for a little bit of news, the latest on the suspect in the boston bombings, cnn reports that the surviving suspect has told investigators that his older brother, not any international terrorist group, asked her mind of the deadly cnn is attributing that to a government source. pulmonary interviews with dzhokhar tsarnaev indicate that the two brothers had the classification of self- radicalized jihadists. has conveyed -- dzhokhar tsarnaev has conveyed to investigators that his brother's motivation was jihaa jihadist p. here is the "washington post" -- the two brothers suspected of bombing the boston marathon appeared to be motivated by their religious faith, but do not appear to be connected to any terrorist group. we are a
failed to pass background checks. five democrats even voted against the new law. all of them from progun states why did the background checks fail. sane people stopped from buying guns. every sane person knows that checks will not keep guns out of the bad people. they will buy weapons illegally. if the president were really serious about protecting malcolm jenkins from gun violence he would federalize gun crimes and attach a criminal justice component to the gun check legislation. here is what mr. obama should do. registering firearms should be in this country. use the gun in the commission of a crime, 10 years. law abiding people with guns are not the problem. so let's give the police a big advantage. if the cops even find unregistered gun by a stop and frisk, something like that. it's a felony. that would take gun criminals off the streets fast obviously drastically cut gun violence. president obama's gun legislation is targeted, pardon the pun at law abiding people. not criminals. and that's the reason. he isn't getting anywhere. some stats to back my opinion up. 2011 the fbi reports
following the interview. if this were to become law, how department in sure they're adequately screen for national security threats? permit togulations confer with the state department to verify the veracity of an applicant's claim. to what extent do they use the authority? are other barriers that prevent this between the agency's? encies? improved theeatly information available from the get go in terms of what data bases are a check box. that source from the beginning when we collect this. with respect to the state department, we have very could relations with the state area which is the credible fear. >> you will check whether that is an accurate statement. >> yes. we do not take it as being valued. bille concern is that this truncates the process. i would just ask you to look at that. student visao the fraud. this is something i have been interested in since 9/11 when there was a lot of it in the country. schools goingked at back to 2008, most of in 2011. eight of the 14 schools are in my state where there are very suspicious activities going on. have 10,500 schools approved by dhs
. i want to congratulate and thank all of the law enforcement authorities for the extraordinary job that they have been doing on behalf of our citizens. in the past few days, we have seen the best and the worst of human behavior. it is the best that all of us really want to focus on. like everyone, we are going to keep watching. we will await word from the law enforcement officers before commenting further. it's a huge easure fore and an important moment to welcome one of our most important partners, our close neighbor and our friend, and i want to welcome my friend, the secretary. one of the first calls i made when i became secretary of state was to josé. we share an alma mater together. he was a graduate student, i was an undergraduate. whatever we don't say right today, you can blame it on them. we obviously share much much more than alma mater. both of us are privileged to represent our extraordinary countries. we share a remarkable friendship and very strong partnership that is growing stronger all the time. for generations we have lived side-by-side as families and neighbors,
with this legislation. we are a safer country when law- enforcement knows who is here, has their fingerprints, photos, conduct background checks, and no wonder these to look at needles through haystacks. both the refugee program and asylum program have been significantly strengthened in the past five years, such that we are much more careful about screening people in determining who should or should not be coming into the country. if there are any changes that our homeland security experts tell us we need to be made -- s, security experts tell us need to be made -- a there were widespread erroneous reports of arrests being made. this emphasizes how important it is to let the facts come out before jumping to any conclusions. mostieve this is the balanced piece of immigration legislation that has been ever produced. the american people and all of our colleagues should read this bill over the next few weeks. they will have ample time to look at every page and every paragraph before we go to markup in the committee. what they will find is a bill the secures our borders, combats the overstay, cracks down
will be placed on the record for those who stood up for sensible gun safety laws in america. i think jo put it well. the parents who have come here and the family members -- i think joe put it well. the parent to have come here in the family members, we need to find a political courage with the disappointment in this vote today. this is not the end. there is more that we can do and will do. reaching out to convince members who voted the other way today and perhaps in the next election to challenge them. bring the issue forward to the american people. this is worth the fight. we have got to stand up to bring sensible gun safety to america. god forbid what tomorrow's victims will be, but we know they will be there. we have to do everything we can to spare another family from this agree. thank you. let me salute all of my andeagues, particularly joe the families who have lit a candle. that is a hard, hard thing to do when you go through what they went through. you do not want to get out of bed, let alone come here and argue truth to power, which you have done. it will not be forgotten. it will
internal administrative restriction we all have given through congress. i don't know what the law is. >> we will make a request on that. and appreciate your follow-up on it. we go now to karen bass of california. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to congratulate secretary kerry on your appointment and also join my colleagues in expressing my condolences. i look forward to working with you and especially working with the committed women and men at the state department. i have to tell you that i have really enjoyed working directly with the state department and i'm honored to have an excellent pearson fellow in my office who i am looking forward to continue to work with me. as the ranking member of the africa subcommittee, i wanted to share with you several priority issues i hope you'll consider. first of all u.s.-africa trade relations. number two, the importance of development assistance programs, including global hiv-aids funding through pet far. and number three, support for peacekeeping operation. as you know the u.n. is considering establishing a peacekeeping isce in mali, and there al
, led negotiations for the reimplication of east east germ. he is proficient in economics of law, a doctor of law, and he's written a number of books most recently "the future of modernization: what we can learn from the crisis," and, mr. minister, delighted you with are us, look forward to the remarks, and we'll then pepper you with questions. >> thank you very much. sorry for being late, tday,r thout and minds are on the people in boston. we hope it will be over soon. i have to make some remarks, and in europe, and what i wanted to say, we are the member -- [inaudible] we all know the summit in london , up to the meeting today, and we have made a lot of progress. we agree. [inaudible] too much in the european markets,. it is three main issues we are working on. i think in the open markets, we made last couple years, and that is not. in liberty, finance, and marks, we have a different opinion. aits issue as of late. we have to continue in this country. what we've done in europe, and bond markets, banking. [inaudible] financial markets and it is a very -- [inaudible] everyone at
of prosperity and of nations living by rule of law and of nation's living in peace. countries where strong human rights prevail our countries where people do better, economies thrive, rule of law is stronger, governments are more effective and more responsive, and they are countries that lead on the world stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't merely an indicator that a country is likely doing well. it actually unleashes a countries potential, and it helps to advance growth and progress. so i ask you just to think of the country like burma for a minute. because of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections, a country that had been isolated for years is now making progress. as it reached where we wanted to be? know, but it's on the road. it's moving. and more people are contributed economy and participating in the government, leading toasr growth andnt. and by starting to embrace universal rights, the burmese government has opened the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood and with countries around the wo
guard law enforcement detachments so in fact we can change operational control to a coast guard commander when we detect a drug smuggler as use that as a coast guard cutter because we have our people embarked on the navy ships. the loss of the ships in the caribbean ultimately will result in more drugs in a are making it through. i know, talking to joint interagency task force south, because we have a good coast guard representation. in fact, its director is a coast guard admiral, right now we are only intercepting about 1/3 of the tracks we are aware of in people smuggling drugs towards central america. last year, we interdicted 107 metric tons. that's 107 metric tons of pure cocaine that didn't make it into south -- into central america to make its way across our borders. by comparison, all the law enforcement agencies in the 48 states only interdicted only 40 metric tons of cocaine. and that's after its broken down as well. so more drugs and we'll have fewer assets that we can redivert to other missions like migrant interdiction and other coast guard activities in those areas
lancaster. they did not wish to recognize his upbringing location. lancaster for his law practice? >> he chose it as his adult home. thes it true he would use place isn't entertaining spot for members of congress when they would come by? >> it was a lovely home. invited people to come, and it was a nice piece of property. >> lancaster is the site of our next call. >> i appreciate it. i just want to ask if you can elaborate on the wedding, where and anyplace interesting details. >> harry it did not get married until after leaving the white house? >> she was 35 years old or 36 years old when she got married. buchanan was very happy about it. johnson.ed a man named some people say he was a lawyer. he may have been a lawyer first and then a banker. to like eacheem to other. they decided it was time to get married, and buchanan was very happy about it. he died a year and a half later, so he knew he was getting on in life, and they moved to baltimore. they lived in baltimore for years. failedcalled it a presidency. south carolina was about to secede. here is a look at america from the 1860's.
of border enforcement as part of its broader anti-crime law enforcement. those efforts were part of that democratic thinking and action at the time. they took up the issue of border enforcement in a role that has become a tint to it -- a continuous stream since research. intoudgets that went building the border and building the southwest border capability started in 1994. those budgets, i think when you look back at the record, the official start. taking border enforcement seriously. and putting a border effort into place that has become, since, a bipartisan support it issue. the question of putting them into the border has been a continuous stream since 1994. requests and appropriations, when republicans and democrats led the white house and both republicans and democrats led either in the senate or house overall. this is an unbroken chain and continues to go. we see it in day to day. we will see when a bill is announced tomorrow or whenever, having continuing emphasis on border security and on spending on border security. with the initial budget, we worked on the border in ways
led the negotiations for the reunification of east germany. he is proficient in economics and law and vlad holds a doctorate of law and is written a number of books most recently the future of modernization, what we can learn from the crisis. mr. minister we are delighted you are with us and we look forward to your remarks and then we will pepper you with questions. >> thank you very much. sorry for being late. today we are, our hearts and minds are with boston and i hope it will be over soon. i have to make remarks on the financial markets that are going well in europe as you all know. [laughter] i will be brief to have time for discussion and therefore i just want to say we all remember the crisis that started in the united states in 2008 and in 2008 we all agreed it will never happen again. we have to learn our lessons. the summit to london and pittsburgh and a two the g20 meeting today in boston. we have made a lot of progress in doing this since then. we agreed that the reason -- there are three reasons. too much -- too much liquidity in the financial markets and too few regu
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
consideration. amazon already collects sales tax. the current law requires them to collect the sales tax for online purchases if they have a physical presence in the state where the consumer lives. if the legislation passes, though, online retailers with revenues of more than a million dollars a year could be faced with the task of keeping up with 10,000 different tax jurisdictions. even though all of us are supposed to claim uncollected sales tax on the filings, i bet most of us don't. >> 10,000 tax jurisdictions. that's ridiculous. >> it's a lot. thanks a lot. airlines, railroads and the all important apple. all those reports out today. and the earnings squad standing by to break it down. this can save you hundreds of dollars on your cell phone blil. why millions around the world are kicking it when the ceo of kik messenger joins us live. the ocean gets warmer. the peruvian anchovy harvest suffers. it raises the price of fishmeal, cattle feed and beef. bny mellon turns insights like these into powerful investment strategies. for a university endowment. it funds a marine biologist... wh
human rationality. people do all kinds of really stupid things. we enact stupid laws sometimes that a lot of people agree on more because certain interest groups influence others. look at the gun legislation. yeah it's for the failure to enact it is driven by the economic interest of a certain small bunch of businesses but is that really why a huge number of other individuals who believe that's a good thing to do or wildly misinterpret the second amendment because they feel it within themselves. with regard to slavery and you jumped off from that, one of the things that became and has become clear to me the more i have delved into the world of the slave owner it's self and indeed the pre-emancipation north where it wasn't really all that different, is that a lot of people really liked slavery. they liked it. yes it was profitable but it wasn't always all that profitable and a motivator particularly in the 19th century was much of the south it was up into the respectable middle class to own a slave. it gave you a status in the stature that you might not have otherwise so why did
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19